sealPurdue News Digest
____

September 18, 1998

Purdue news summary for week of Sept. 13-18

This digest contains summaries of the following stories from Purdue News Service and Agricultural Communication Service. All these stories, and more, are available on the World Wide Web.

(Instructions for retrieving stories and photographs via the Internet are at the end of this document.)

1. Executives from around the world head back to class

2. Web weaves new concerns about plagiarism

3. Martina McBride, Tracy Byrd to perform Nov. 6 at Purdue

4. New Purdue Symphony concert series to bring in big names

5. Test before you invest: Purdue offers global positioning display

6. Farmers need a pesticide safety plan, expert says

7. Farmers can help themselves by helping first responders

8. Fewer dying in accidents on Indiana farms

9. Purdue News Roundup

  • Winter commencement times move
  • McCoy Award winner to present distinguished lecture Sept. 25
  • Adaptive Programs to showcase accessibility resources
  • Super Saturday registration under way for fall courses
  • Week of activities to highlight nuclear engineering
  • Purdue sponsors Women in Engineering Career Day
  • Purdue Notebook: Roger Finke creates an Internet-based archive at http://www.arda.tm for learning about American religion; Council on the Status of Women sponsors reception for Alysa Rollock, interim vice president for human relations, at 3:30 p.m. Thursday (9/24) in the Krannert Building Drawing Room.

10. Ag News Roundup

  • Rural safety materials available from Purdue
  • Antique tractors can be dangerous, expert says
  • Accelerated payments provide impetus to settle farmland leases

11. Purdue calendar

12. Agriculture calendar

13. Best Bets for Journalists

14. Computer science experts

15. National Business Package

16. Inside Purdue and Perspective

RESEARCH NEWS AND SPECIAL REPORTS

1. Executives from around the world head back to class

First MBA programs made special arrangements for busy executives. Now the programs have gone international. The executive MBA programs did away with the tradition of attending class full-time. Rather, an executive in such a program typically spends evenings or weekends working on courses for the MBA and then meets for intensive sessions a few times a year on campus. Now, with the international component, those intensive sessions are held in a variety of locations worldwide. For example, an executive might work in Chicago, take classes via the Internet at Purdue in West Lafayette, Ind., and spend two weeks at Purdue, two weeks in Hungary and another two weeks in the Netherlands. "What you learned as an undergraduate 20 years ago, isn't enough to lead or to compete in today's global workplace," says Martin Rapisarda, director of the executive master's programs at Purdue's Krannert Graduate School of Management.

2. Web weaves new concerns about plagiarism

The World Wide Web is the home for millions of pages of information on every topic that the human mind can conceive. It also is a home for plagiarism. Stuart Offenbach, a professor of psychology at Purdue and a national expert in dealing with academic misconduct, says: "The area of professional misconduct has actually changed quite a bit over the past two, two and a half years. The Internet is a whole order of magnitude of a new kind of problem."

GENERAL INTEREST NEWS

3. Martina McBride, Tracy Byrd to perform Nov. 6 at Purdue

Two "young country" recording and performing artists, Martina McBride and Tracy Byrd, will appear in concert at 8 p.m. Friday, Nov. 6, in Elliott Hall of Music at Purdue. The show is presented by Purdue Convocations. Tickets are $22.50 and go on sale at 10 a.m. Monday, Oct. 5, at campus box offices. Patrons may charge by phone at (765) 494-3933 or 1-800-914-SHOW. Members of Friends of Convocations who have contributed $50 or more may purchase tickets in advance.

4. New Purdue Symphony concert series to bring in big names

The Purdue Symphony Orchestra will establish a formal concert series thanks to a $22,000 start-up grant from the Clowes Fund. "Establishing a formal concert series is a significant step for us because it enables us to bring internationally renowned soloists to campus," said Jay Gephart, assistant professor of bands. "It also will allow us to plan a repertoire in advance and advertise the entire series." The grant will fund the first year of the concert series while funding is sought for future years. The four Sunday concerts in the series during this school year, all free and open to the public, will be Oct. 25, Dec. 6, Feb. 28 and April 18.

AGRICULTURAL NEWS

5. Test before you invest: Purdue offers global positioning display

An eye-in-the-sky, birds' eye view of your farm field could be just what you need to fine-tune your farm production. And you can get it from global positioning satellites, which allow an in-depth analysis of production components ranging from nutrient analysis to yield rates, from pest problems to soil density. For farmers who just aren't sold on the merits of this investment, a Purdue exhibit at the 1998 Farm Progress Show will offer a chance to check out some of what GPS has to offer without coughing up the cash. Comprehensive data from a 10-acre field of no-till corn adjacent to the show site will be available for review. The Farm Progress Show will be Sept. 29-Oct. 1 near Windfall, Ind., in Tipton County.

6. Farmers need a pesticide safety plan, expert says

Everyone knows to put out small fires before they become infernos. For farmers who use fertilizers and pesticides, a chemical accident is analogous to a small fire -- if it's not handled properly, and with haste, it could develop into a catastrophe. Fred Whitford, coordinator of the Purdue Pesticide Program, said a well-developed pesticide plan is the first step in preventing such a catastrophe. His list of items that a good pesticide safety plan should include is particularly appropriate during National Farm Safety and Health Week, which is Sept. 20-26.

7. Farmers help themselves by helping first responders

Farmers may view their spread as a piece of heaven, but emergency personnel may view it as a dangerous environment full of fatal traps. The result is that the two groups often don't work together as well as they should, even though they may be friends and neighbors. Fred Whitford, coordinator of the Purdue Pesticide Program, said the abundance of chemicals stored on a modern farm makes some firefighters wary. And Bill Field, professor of agricultural and biological engineering and director of Purdue's Agricultural Safety and Health Program, said emergency personnel can be hurt on the farm if they don't realize the dangers. Whitford and Field said that emergency personnel and farmers often work well together once they begin talking to one another.

8. Fewer dying in accidents on Indiana farms

A summary of farm fatalities in Indiana shows that 21 people died in farm accidents in 1997. That is three fewer than in 1996 and half as many as died in 1995. Bill Field, professor of agricultural and biological engineering and director of Purdue's Agricultural Safety and Health Program, said the number of farm fatalities in Indiana has been steadily declining during the 20 years that he has been compiling the summary. He also said that some patterns have emerged that may serve as warnings to farm families: Almost all of the deaths are males; tractors were involved in 38 percent of the deaths; more than half of the victims are over 60 years old; a quarter of the fatalities are part-time hobby farmers; and many of the children killed on the farm were in the care of grandparents.

MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS

9. Purdue News Roundup

See summary of headlines at beginning of this document.

10. Ag News Roundup

See summary of headlines at beginning of this document.

11. Purdue calendar

This calendar lists entertainment events, lectures, exhibits and meetings involving Purdue people during the next four weeks. An interactive, on-line calendar of Purdue events.

12. Agriculture calendar

This calendar lists Purdue Agriculture events during the next four weeks.

13. Best Bets for Journalists

Here's an expert who can talk about how students can plan to succeed on standardized tests. "Best Bets" also has details about a Sept. 22 Career Day in the Department of Restaurant, Hotel, Institutional and Tourism Management; a Sept. 23 lecture about Jewish genetic diseases; a Sept. 24 dedication of the new Food Science Building; and a Sept. 26 demonstration of scientific glassblowing.

14. Computer science experts

Here are seven experts who can discuss computer chip technology, computer crime, cyberterrorism, computer ethics, information security, parallel processing, scientific computing and the use of the World Wide Web.

15. National Business Package

These stories were distributed nationally this week to business, finance and technology reporters. A Web site with links to all the stories and photos in this package.

1. Purdue innovations named in top 100 new technologies (Two color photos available.)

2. Executives from around the world head back to class

3. Business, finance and technology news briefs

  • Research answers burning questions about pollution (Color photo available.)
  • Biotech foods ready for primetime, experts say
  • Cash in on cost-saving tips
4. Economic affairs experts

16. Inside Purdue and Perspective

Check the on-line versions of Inside Purdue , the faculty/staff newspaper, and Perspective , a quarterly publication for alumni, parents of students, faculty and staff, for other news about Purdue.

How to retrieve stories and photographs electronically

Purdue News Service produces e-mail digests of stories on six topics: agriculture; business, finance and technology; education and careers; lifestyles; science and health; and weekly Purdue News (that's this digest)

To subscribe (or unsubscribe) to this service:

  • Address your request to: listserv@vm.cc.purdue.edu
  • Use a mail form with no text or graphics
  • Leave the subject line blank. In the body, indicate which digest(s) you want:

subscribe AGNEWS
subscribe BIZNEWS
subscribe EDNEWS
subscribe LIFENEWS
subscribe SCINEWS
subscribe PU-NEWS (Purdue subscribers)
subscribe PUWEEK (non-Purdue subscribers)

To unsubscribe, just substitute "unsubscribe" for "subscribe."

Problems? Contact Mike Willis, Purdue News Service, (765) 494-0371; e-mail, mike_willis@purdue.edu

Releases and downloadable photographs also are available at the PurdueNews Web site or the ftp site. The Web site also offers a searchable data base of Purdue and Big 10 experts. Faculty and staff may register as experts at the Web site. Purdue News Service: (765) 494-2096; e-mail, purduenews@purdue.edu


* To the Purdue News and Photos Page